Slayer  and Anthrax in Dublin Jun17

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Slayer and Anthrax in Dublin

SLAYER IN DUBLIN (WITH ANTHRAX)

When it comes to the ‘Big Four’ of thrash metal, the focus has always tended – rightly or wrongly – to be on Metallica and Megadeth. Tonight in Dublin, Anthrax and Slayer showed just how misguided that attention is.

Anthrax led the charge with an hour long set that sent the sold out Olympia into paroxysms of delight. Seemingly caught in a permanent time warp (bar the colour of guitarist Scott Ian’s now grey beard) they are still bursting with youthful energy and enthusiasm even this far into their career. Beginning with ‘You Gotta Believe’ they immediately hit the ground running (at times literally; vocalist Joey Belladonna scampers around the stage like an ebullient child, often leaping into the air with abandon) and simply don’t let up for a second.

What follows is a relentless barrage of hits and favourite albums tracks spanning the length of their career. From their 1990 cover of ‘Got the Time’ to the ‘woah-oh’ singalong that is ‘Antisocial’, to an absolutely masterful ‘Indians’ and of course their unofficial theme tune ‘Caught In a Mosh’ they hit every nail on the head with vigour and astonishingly levels of cheerful energy – they’re so happy! – driving the crowd wild in the process. A flawless performance.

METALPLANET BELFAST-1250744

By the time Slayer take to the stage half an hour later the room is so charged that even the appearance of their backdrop has the crowd cheering wildly, while AC/DC’s ‘Thunderstruck’ playing on the PA has it’s lyrics change to “Slayer!”. So when the intro to ‘Repentless’ rings out, the roar nearly blows the roof off.

From then on, every tune is met with howls of delighted recognition and thunderous applause, not to mention horns and fists proudly aloft as far as the eye could see. As with Anthrax, they run the gamut of their career tonight, from 1986’s ‘Postmortem’ to ‘Disciple’ from 2001, right up to ‘When the Stillness Comes’ from latest album Repentless. And of course, they also play long time favourites such as ‘Raining Blood’ and ‘South of Heaven’.

Every song is an all out aural assault, brooding, malevolent and dripping with menace. Cleverly, they alternate their more mid paced material with the blisteringly fast stuff so momentum is never lost. There are also only brief pauses between tracks, during which frontman Tom Araya chats amiably with the crowd. “You guys sound excited” he remarks with droll understatement at one point, which causes the crowd to burst out laughing and roar with approval simultaneously.

Even the lighting accentuates their show, whether it be by hue, such as the icy blue light the floods the stage during ‘Mandatory Suicide’ or by the frantically flashing strobes during the likes of ‘Hate Worldwide’, or even the lone spotlight on Araya as he smiles beatifically whilst quietly bathing in the adoration of the crowd – in fact, with every moment of silence more than five seconds long filled with a delirious “Slayer! Slayer!” chant, that smile appears often!

A rare subdued moment during the intro of ‘Seasons In the Abyss’ aside, their ninety minute set is a pummelling, punishing lesson in thrash metal mastery. They finish with the ‘oldies but oh so goodies’ twin attack of ‘Raining Blood’ and ‘Angle of Death’, complete with a stunning backdrop tribute to fallen hero Jeff Hanneman, before exiting the stage to almost deafening applause.

Gigs like this one are finally beginning to even out the attention thrash metal’s so called Big Four receive. Tonight saw two bands still flying the flag for high quality thrash, even after all these years. Long may they reign (in blood).

Review by Melanie Black

ANTHRAX IN DUBLIN (WITH SLAYER)

When it comes to the ‘Big Four’ of thrash metal, the focus has always tended – rightly or wrongly – to be on Metallica and Megadeth. Tonight in Dublin, Anthrax and Slayer showed just how misguided that attention is. 

METALPLANET BELFAST-3106 METALPLANET BELFAST-2986 METALPLANET BELFAST-2964

Anthrax led the charge with an hour long set that sent the sold out Olympia into paroxysms of delight. Seemingly caught in a permanent time warp (bar the colour of guitarist Scott Ian’s now grey beard) they are still bursting with youthful energy and enthusiasm even this far into their career. Beginning with ‘You Gotta Believe’ they immediately hit the ground running (at times literally; vocalist Joey Belladonna scampers around the stage like an ebullient child, often leaping into the air with abandon) and simply don’t let up for a second.

What follows is a relentless barrage of hits and favourite albums tracks spanning the length of their career. From their 1990 cover of ‘Got the Time’ to the ‘woah-oh’ singalong that is ‘Antisocial’, to an absolutely masterful ‘Indians’ and of course their unofficial theme tune ‘Caught In a Mosh’ they hit every nail on the head with vigour and astonishingly levels of cheerful energy – they’re so happy! – driving the crowd wild in the process.

Having been around for decades (“It’s been thirty five years for Anthrax now”, Belladonna informs the crowd proudly, to huge roars) they are obviously consummate professionals, yet they have lost none of their sense of pleasure in performing live, nor of simply engaging with an audience, such as when Ian takes a moment to rib the fans in the seated areas (Just because you got a seat don’t mean you have to sit in it – this ain’t church, you know!”), while Belladonna is quietly humble yet clearing having a ball.

The rather unusual aspect of Anthrax is that each member is an equal; it’s not all about the singer. Yes, everyone knows about their famous bearded rhythm guitarist, but bassist Frank Bello and lead guitarist Jonathan Donais take equal time at the front of the stage, raising horns and encouraging the crowd, while drummer Charlie Benante is surrounded by so many cymbals (at least thirteen!) that nobody could possibly ignore him.

As is required in thrash metal, tonight is a night packed with riffs: riffs that could knock through walls, riffs that could cut like a razor, riffs that punch you gleefully in the gut. The crowd respond with equally exultant delight, roaring lustily after each song and singing along at top volume. And when Ian asks “Do you want us to come back and do a headline tour here?”, the response threatens to raise the roof. A flawless performance.

Slayer also come out all guns blazing, starting with the title track from their recent album Repentless; from then on every tune is met with thunderous applause and howls of delighted recognition. As with Anthrax their set runs the gamut of their career, from 1986’s ‘Postmortem’ to ‘Disciple’ from 2001, to ‘When the Stillness Comes’ from Repentless, and of course long time favourites ‘Raining Blood’ and ‘Angel of Death’, complete with a backdrop dedicated to fallen hero Jeff Hanneman. Every track is an all out aural assault, brooding, malevolent and dripping with menace. Cleverly, they alternate their more mid paced material with the blisteringly fast stuff so momentum is never lost, right up until final track ‘Angel of Death’, after which they leave the stage to thunderous applause.

Gigs like this one are finally beginning to even out the attention thrash metal’s so called Big Four receive. Tonight saw two bands still flying the flag for high quality thrash, even after all these years. Long may they reign (in blood).

Review by Melanie Black

 

 

 

 

Slayer/Anthrax

Olympia Theatre, Dublin

14th June, 2016-06-15

THERE has to come a point when a band has been going so long that re-treading the same songs for the fans who come for the ‘hits’ rather than to hear new tracks, and with more recently formed acts now winning newer, younger audiences you look at tours and wonder is it worth the while seeing bands 30 plus years into their career.

Not when it comes to Slayer and Anthrax. Despite the rapturous response to the songs from the 1980s these bands are still releasing quality product and change things up enough for the live shows.

As one half of the ‘Big Four’ both bands stand head and shoulders above many of the so-called pretenders from that era that have ended up playing tiny venues. In Dublin on (Tuesday) June 14th at a sold-out Olympia Theatre they proved why they are still on the road, still recording new albums and still attracting positive reviews, as well as roars from appreciative audiences.

Despite it being a Tuesday night, even before the show began, the atmosphere was that of a party, a celebration of thrash – from the smoking area to the queues in the bars chat and anticipation were rife.

With latest release ‘For All Kings’ Anthrax have managed to exceed the heady heights of ‘Worship Music’ when Joey Belladonna returned to the fold. And, despite the usual form of fans awaiting the older tracks the majority were familiar with the new songs as the band opened with ‘For All Kings’ opener ‘You Gotta Believe’ – a gutsy move given the running time of almost seven minutes.

Then came the short, sharp shock of their cover of Joe Jackson’s ‘Got The Time’, even more furiously fast and ferocious than the hyper-speed album version. The crowd could have been exhausted trying to keep up with the band roaring the chorus, but whether it was the beer, the atmosphere or energy drinks via intravenous drips there was energy to spare.

The energy from the band was impressive, as they tore through ‘Caught In A Mosh’ and ‘Madhouse’. Even those tracks were outshone by ‘Fight ‘Em Til You Can’t’. Come the zombie apocalypse this will be the tune the survivors will want played.

Lead single from ‘For All Kings’ ‘Evil Twin’ was perhaps the only part of the set that saw band and fans flag slightly, but the ever reliable cover of trust’s ‘Antisocial’ had fists back in the air, Scott Ian grinning like an inmate of the aforementioned ‘Madhouse’, Joey stalking like a predatory thrasher and Frank Bello bounding across the stage.

New(ish) lead player Jonathan Donais has not only the chops but subtle adjustments to older solos, without losing their essence.

Charlie Benante is perhaps the most under-rated of the ‘thrash’ drummers, with both power and an almost lyrical quality to his fills, such as on new track ‘Breathing Lightning’.

Of course, ‘Indians’ brought the raucous set to a close with impassioned singalongs from all in attendance.

Anthrax set the bar high for Slayer, as the audience took a well-deserved break after the energy of the opening set.

13453143_1801004376797573_1874982278_o-2

To a certain extent Slayer at times look like your favourite uncles playing metal; even Tom Arya seems like Santa Claus’s evil twin, resplendent in his grey beard and malevolent twinkle in his eye.

Like Anthrax they opened with a new song, the title track from last year’s release ‘Repentless’. Glorious, furious.

The entire 17-song set was a blur of brutality; speed metal and thrash at its best. Whether it was ‘Pride In Prejudice’ from ‘Repentless or the faithful version of ‘War Ensemble’ the band were a unified force of unholy nature.

Arya tortured his bass, while Kerry King belied his dark persona at times with an occasional small, sneaky grin with his band members. However, truth be told some of the old favourites seemed (just a little) like running through the numbers, but it was a small niggle as the songs’ strengths and the band’s ability was enough to carry them through. Few would have noticed.

Gary Holt, fresh from a tour with his thrash alma mater, Exodus, seemed energised, particularly on a jaw-dropping version of ‘When The Stillness Comes’.

The experience of Slayer is such that they balance their set well, from new tracks such as ‘Take Control’ through to old favourites they know what the crowd wants.

Paul Bostaph’s position behind the drum stool always provokes debate among keyboard warriors, but there is no doubt of not only his ability, but his invention. On ‘Hate Worldwide’ and ‘Dead Skin Mask’ he combined thunder and lightning in an aural assault.

Of course, Slayer know what is required to close their set and send fans home exhausted and happy. ‘Seasons of the Abyss’, South of Heaven’ and ‘Raining Blood’ blasted out across a Dublin audience like a tsunami of terrifying metal. Tremendous.

It is a useless exercise to try and decide who performed the better set. Both bands may be lumped into the category of the thrash big four as both have their own interpretation of what thrash is supposed to be and both managed to not only give the crowd old faves, but air new songs.

But then again, while the critics of the 1980s and later may be content to push them into corners, on June 14th Slayer and Anthrax set out their individual stalls for 2016.

One can only hope that they continue to not only tour, but produce fresh material which will compel them to keep touring well into the future.

 

Would you like to use this review or Photos article?

If you would like to use this news article, please complete the form below and we will get back to you ASAP;

 

Required fields are marked *

Important Info

Please do not use our images or wording without permission.

 

All images and words shown on this website and Facebook page (‘Jace Media’) are protected by international copyright law.

No images or wording maybe taken, copied or used without written permission from ‘Jace Media’ and its subsidiaries:

Jace Photography – Kent

Jace Photography – Durham


Do you have news articles similar to this you would like to sell?

Please take a look at our Join Us page to see how we can help you

Join Us

468 ad