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Glen Hughes – Resonate

Glen Hughes – Resonate

Before we delve into this album I want you to do a bit of work. I want you to think of all the bands/musicians you know who have been going for 40 years. Got them? Ok now be honest and tell me how many are still playing live at the top of their game? Your list just dropped a whole lot didn’t it. Now of who you have left who is still producing albums as good as their best years? Have you got enough to count on one hand?

This is where Glen Hughes comes in, he ticks all of the boxes above. He has been part of Rock royalty for a long time and a name I learned about when I first fell in love with this music 36 years ago. That name has never been far away through all that time. Just last year I watched in awe with an open mouth when he covered Mistreated live. I saw a few versions of Deep purple over the years and no one sang that song anywhere near as well as Glen Did that night, it was a slice of Rock heaven.

This album is just anther testament to his talent, another rung on the ladder above everyone else. I also got to speak with the man last year and I was amazed at how humble and down to earth he was…a thing that cannot be said about a good few of his past bandmates.

The opening track heavy will already have reached you and if you failed to be impressed check your pulse please. This is a brilliant song which fuses 70s, funk and outright metal. “My Town” has a real fuzzy sound and Glen get downright sleazy on us. This sounds up to date but it has its roots in the 70s also. A funked up blues godsend.

Flow” is as heavy as hell, it has a punishing riff and the bass thunders throughout. I imagine I can even hear those loose bass strings throbbing. It may have a Hendrix tinge but this is bang up to date. The fuzz guitar on “ Let It Shine” is excellent and it takes me way back with Glen. It is steeped in a hippy shake with its lazy chorus but it is a serious contender for best track on the album.

Just listen to that hammond organ on “Steady”, this could be Purple, this could be Rainbow at their absolute best. This track is wide open to break any genre and I can imagine this being played by Rock/Indie/Metal and Pop radio stations. A relaxed beast of a song.

God Of Money” comes out with a real heavy riff. It is gently balanced between doom and stoner. Glen’s vocals go from deep to crystal glass smashing in seconds. The voice that soars live and never dips or lets him down. “ How Long” has a keyboard backbone but this is old school blues ivories. Working with Joe Bonamassa rubbed off and seeps through every note of this song and it builds my anticipation for the upcoming reunion.

When I Fall” slips nicely off the back of the previous number, it slows it down and I can now picture a video for this set in a smoky, sweaty Jazz club. “ Landmines” has Glen at high vocals again and this song reminded me of one of my favourite Scottish bands in King King. It is a funked up Blues rocker and it is outstanding.

The riff on “Stumble & Go” is pure Neil Young and “Rocking In The Free world”. It has that groove, it has better vocals and a nice twist. This is an arena filler. The album closes out with “Long Time Gone” and it is a hell of a way to bow out. The intro of just Glen and an acoustic guitar sounds amazing blasting full volume through massive speakers, it is just a pity that I will not get to hear this live in a couple of weeks due to the tour cancellation but it will give me more time to fall in love with this album (as if that is needed).

Glen has been associated with so many classic albums over the years that you could accept his best work may be behind him but do you know what? Somebody better tell the man himself as he isn’t listening. This is a blistering album and it holds up to every single one of those albums. “Resonate” is a winner and it is packed with a whole new raft of classics that the man can add to his credit. This man has outlasted so many bands and this CD tells you why. Talent is talent and this man oozes it from his very pores.

Review Ritchie Birnie

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