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LIVE REVIEW: Jimmy Barnes – When a Working Class Man storms the Limelight

LIVE REVIEW: Jimmy Barnes – When a Working Class Man storms the Limelight

TWO acts and one whole massive show of soul, blues and rock ‘n’ roll stormed in the Limelight in the forms of Lachlan Doley and the rock legend that is Jimmy Barnes.

Lachlan was up first and he is a true live soulful blues singing wonder to behold.

Watching him as he plays the Hammond organ as he impossibly genuflects out of it soul and blues music of epic proportions.

It is a true pleasure to behold.

He seems to be a hyperactive Duracell bunny crossed with Kurt Cobain and it is utterly infectious. As he powered into his set, the crowd were presented with a remarkable visual and auditory indulgence of emotionally exuberant soulful blues.

Along with his captivating growl driven vocals, Lachlan pumped and pummelled the blues out of his Hammond like a modern day Jerry Lee Lewis.  His seat seemed to be more of a prop than a practical necessity. What a performance to start the night.

Then came the living legend that is Jimmy Barnes. There is really no over estimation, no high expectations nor high standards that could ever come close to cowing what this man delivers with his band.

You could never be disappointed at the performance this rock behemoth gives.

The crowd could see that with every song Jimmy sang, he was putting his heart and soul into it conveying raw power, passion and humanity in its most stripped down form.

This man bared himself to the packed crowd, and they lapped it up, giving back as good as he gave.

This was a whole new level of audience participation on an almost spiritual level.

Kicking off with ‘Love and Hate’, ‘I’d Die To Be With You’, ‘Ride the Night Away’, and ‘Love is Enough’, Jimmy lovingly but forcefully put his stamp on what was to come.

Each song beautifully rendered with his gravelled throaty vocals that had a resonating cadence making the hairs on your neck stand up.

You know you were in the presence of a very special performer and you will pay attention.

‘Red Hot’, ‘Still on Your Side, ‘Lay Down Your Guns’, ‘Boys Cry Out for War’, and ‘Too Much’ continued the skilfully crafted songs, Jimmy was giving everyone there a concert par excellence.

‘Little Darling’, ‘Resurrection’, ‘Merry-Go-Round’, ‘Flame Trees’, and ‘Driving Wheels’ continued the onslaught of poignantly laid down vocals, blues and rock riffs, and soulful requiems to a hard and tough life.

Swooping from ballads to love songs to toe tapping, knee bending pure old rock and roll, Jimmy kept the adoring crowd on a crest of elation, as they swayed or bounced about like happy rockers.

Jimmy did not let up at all as he continued to power on through ‘No Second Prize’, ‘Seven Days’, the magnificent ‘Khe Sanh’ and of course, the anthem ‘Working Class Man’. The audience really could not get enough of this performance. The joy of being there mixed with the realisation the evening was coming to a close.

And, with every superb performance there must always be an encore…

Jimmy and his band did not disappoint.

Back onto the stage they executed a beautiful rendition of ‘Stone Cold’ leading into a magnificent cover of AC/DC ‘s ‘High Voltage’, which electrified the audience once more. He finished with ‘Goodbye’.

As they left the stage to another rapturous applause they all sprinted back on to stage where Jimmy informed the crowd that he forgot a song. And, it was almost perfect that the very last song of the night was ‘Good Times’.

This gig highlighted something very important that everyone should know, seeing Jimmy Barnes is an essential bucket list entry. If you get even a sniff of an opportunity to go, then drop everything and go!

Review by Ivor Whitten
Pictures by Darren McVeigh